Category Archives: Intellectual Property Law

Pay By Selfie Arms Race: Amazon.com Pulls Ahead?

Amazon Filed For A Coveted Patent; What Does It Mean For Consumers & Sellers? What’s the next big e-commerce thing? Pay by selfie — and Amazon recently filed a patent application for the process. Analysts speculate that the company will pair the facial recognition system with a payment authentication method it also owns. By simplifying Read More

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European Commission Hyperlink Controversy

By now, you’ve probably heard the hype: “The European Commission [EC] is about to ruin the Internet by making people pay for hyperlinks!” But you can relax. Per usual, the cautionary bark is likely more threatening than the potential, actual bite. Despite the headlines, the chance of European officials turning links into toll booths are Read More

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Online News Aggregation: Is It On Its Way Out?

Will it soon be illegal to aggregate news links? Some people think so – including Matt Drudge – founder of the right-wing news site, DrudgeReport.com. Are We Headed For a “Content Net Neutrality” Battle? For years, citizens, politicians and businesses have deliberated the pros and cons of so-called “net neutrality.” The main debate: Is it Read More

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Can Someone Else use my name in their Google Adwords Campaign?

“Can someone use my name – or my company’s name – in their Adwords campaign?” As a firm that focuses on Internet law issues, we hear that question – a lot. And some folks are surprised to learn that, on occasion, the answer is: “Maybe.” After all, as they say: Alls A whole lot is Read More

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Online Copyright Showdown: The Google MPAA Feud

What is the deal with the Google MPAA feud anyway? Why are the two parties always fighting and lobbing barely veiled criticisms? And why did Google just sue the state of Mississippi because of the MPAA?

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Big False Advertising Law News: SCOTUS Changes The Rules

Bluntly speaking, the U.S. Supreme Court usually picks lawsuits that dwell at the intersection of “American Morals Avenue” and “Dispassionate Law Lane,” leaving the quasi-wonkish definitional deliberations to the appellate circuit. But not this time. Lexmark v. Static Control: Why It Matters In The World Of False Advertising Law Recently, the highest court in the Read More

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Online Copyright Case Study: Experian Information Solutions v. Nationwide Marketing Services

An Arizona Federal District Court tossed an online copyright infringement case. One marketing research company sued another marketing research company for allegedly encroaching on a proprietary database. In the end, the judge sided with the defense, reasoning that no actual copyright had been violated. It’s a noteworthy case that every data compilation company and online Read More

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Case Study: Online Defamation and Copyright Infringement In One Lawsuit

California lawyer Dionne Choyce wants a community watchdog group to pay for allegedly defaming him and his practice – but the court isn’t making things easy for him. In a recent ruling, Judge Jon Tigar shot-down several of Choyce’s motions – but not all. A suit dealing with both online copyright infringement and defamation, Dionne Read More

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Judge Deems Digitizing Books Fair Use

Google wins again! The online giant emerged victorious from their intellectual property scrap with the Author’s Guild. They battled over Google’s book digitization project, and the circuit court’s final decision was “fair use”. Did presiding judge Denny Crane Chin make the right call? Let’s quickly examine the suit. A Short Summary Of The Google Book Read More

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Patient v. Doctor Online Defamation: Copyright Contracts?

Are copyright contracts, which confer online review rights to doctors, legal? Many have tried, but it looks like those contracts aren’t holding up well in court, and doing even worse in the court of public opinion. Take, for example, a recent story featured on Ars Technica. (Medical professionals, pay heed: in the end, the patient Read More

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AP v. Meltwater News: Summary & Questions

Meltwater News – a San Francisco “commercial media-monitoring service” – hasn’t had much luck in the court room lately. First, they tussled with the UK’s National Licensing Agency and came out bruised. Then, a New York District Court judge ruled against the news clipping service in favor of the Associated Press. While not as widely Read More

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The Week In Internet Law: Illegal Downloading, Online Privacy & Gambling, FTC Happenings

Catch up on the noteworthy, newsworthy and insignificant-but-interesting Internet law news for the week of December 31, 2012 – January 4, 2013. Online Copyright Infringement Prenda’s Legal Tantrum The mystery of Alan Cooper continues to color Prenda’s illegal downloading dragnet. The story is now so sorted, I half expect Hercule Poirot to enter stage left. Read More

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