Grooveshark’s Artist-Friendly Move Is Sure To Enrage Labels

streaming music Grooveshark’s Artist Friendly Move Is Sure To Enrage LabelsYou know the old saying: If you can’t beat ‘em, join ‘em – and online music site, Grooveshark, seems to be taking that sage advice to heart. Instead of getting into bed with the labels, they’re reaching out to artists – a definite sign the company is looking to the future, not miring themselves in the label-model. But will this new move anger the RIAA gods? You better believe it. Why? Because Grooveshark is going to allow users to pay artists directly.

Click Here To Read More About The Legalities Of Streaming Music On The Web

Why Is Grooveshark Hard To Kill?

If you follow file sharing news, then you know that Grooveshark is one of the more bothersome thorns in the RIAA’s side. The platform’s user-sharing format is set up in such a way that it evades certain intellectual property laws. The simple reason Grooveshark has managed to stick around, while others failed, can be succinctly explained in the company’s unofficial motto: Grooveshark does not violate the Digital Millennium Copyright Act.

Over the years, lobbyists and associations have tried to concoct ways to bury Grooveshark. But nothing has stuck. Since Grooveshark ostensibly follows DMCA takedown notice procedures, it’s tough to nail the music streaming service. Yes, there have been accusations that employees are the ones uploading infringing material, but as far as I know, that has yet to be proved.

The New Grooveshark Updates – What It Means

So, on November 1, not only is Grooveshark going to have a snazzy new design, but it will also feature a new service called Flattr. Perhaps the next big thing in crowdsourcing and crowdsupporting, Flattr allows users to deposit money into an account; then, similar to a Facebook “like,” users can choose to “flattr” an artist. At the end of each month, a given user’s account is split between all the people they flattr’d that month. So, let’s say you have $10 in your account for October, and you “flattr” two artists during the month, they would each get $5 from you at the end of the month.

Pretty ingenious if you ask me; the labels are going to despise it and there’s a good chance the “kids” will be all over it – further widening the divide between politics, traditional business models and Internet innovation.

Interested in cyberlaw news, views and information? Sign up for Kelly/Warner Law’s newsletter.